CCAHA

    • Japanese Scroll, After Treatment (2)
  • 264 South 23rd Street  
  • Philadelphia, PA 19103
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P 215.545.0613
  • 
F 215.735.9313

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20th-Century Japanese Scroll

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    • Japanese Scroll, Before Treatment (1)
    • Japanese Scroll, Before Treatment (1)
    • Japanese Scroll, Before Treatment (2)
    • Japanese Scroll, Before Treatment (2)

The scroll was constructed in a traditional Japanese mounting style, using multiple layers of silk fabric and papers suspended between wooden rods. Structurally, the scroll was fairly sound with some minor problems.

The tan silk had darkened over time, as indicated by the lighter colored fabric under the two hanging strips (called fūtai in Japanese) suspended from the top rod.  The fūtai were heavily curled due to improper rolling. Traditionally, the fūtai are creased where they join the rod and about one-third of the way up from the bottom. They are then laid horizontal for folding. The fūtai on this scroll had faint creases in the above mentioned areas. Fūtai are meant to retain their creases while being displayed and do not lie flat against the scroll. There were some small dark brown stains in the green silk. There were light brown stains at the bottom of the scroll in the tan silk.

There were numerous horizontal creases and tears in the paper due to rolling. A tear on the recto, to the left of the second calligraphy character, had severe tenting as well. A triangular area about 2” wide in the lower right section of the paper had tears along its entire perimeter. It had a previous repair, a paper patch on the verso that spanned the entire area of damage. The repair was not aligned precisely.

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    • Japanese Scroll, After Treatment (1)
    • Japanese Scroll, After Treatment (1)
    • Japanese Scroll, After Treatment (2)
    • Japanese Scroll, After Treatment (2)

The old repair in the lower right area was removed using controlled moisture and tweezers. The brown stains in the lower left area and in the old repair were reduced using controlled moisture, blotter and a heated spatula. Some of the treated areas were retouched with dry pigment mixed with water to match the original color of the paper. The old repair was realigned and mended with strips of mulberry paper and wheat starch paste. The tiny losses were inserted with fibers of mulberry paper. Horizontal breaks and weak areas as well as the tear at the bottom rod were mended from the verso with strips of mulberry paper and wheat starch paste. The scroll was humidified overall using dampened Gore-Tex and flattened to the degree possible.